Skip to content

Stop being impressed by scientific theories that will never be proven

June 14, 2006

Enough already with astronomers and people who make mathematical predictions within an accepted error threshold of plus or minus three million. These people can say whatever they feel like knowing that nobody in their lifetime could ever fully prove them wrong. Is the sun really 91 million miles from the Earth or 92? Who knows? None of this is even relevant until we can build an air conditioner that is powerful enough to make the trip worthwhile. There is just no way to truly prove this theory, even if you had more significant digits.

Here is an over exaggerated dramatization of something that never actually happened, and probably doesn’t even prove my point:

Scientific community: “How many years is it going to take the sun to run out of hydrogen and burn itself out?”
Pompous scientist: “5 billion.”
Scientific community: “There’s a conveniently round number. Go get this man a Nobel prize out of the box.”
I understand that there is scientific data backing these theories, but there was probably scientific data backing the idea that the world was flat and that didn’t seem to pan out as planned. Thousands of years from now the astronomers will be laughing at us because we’ll find out something ridiculous like that the sun is actually flat.

I’m just stating my skepticism about all of these theories now, because I don’t want a bunch of future grade school kids laughing at me like I was the stupid one who believed it.

Advertisements

From → Science/Tech

Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: